SEO

[SEO][bsummary]

Tutorial

[Tutorial][bigposts]

Business

[Business][twocolumns]

Microsoft Excel Basics | Learn Excel Completely Part - 2


1.7 MOVING AROUND A WORKSHEET
There are several methods of moving from place to place in an Excel worksheet. If the worksheet is relatively small, all of these methods will work equally well. As a worksheet grows in size, movement becomes more difficult, and you can save a lot of time by learning the various movement methods.
The currently selected cell is called the active cell, and the cell name (e.g., D3) is displayed in the Name box on the left-hand side of the Formula bar, as shown in Figure 1.31.
Figure 1.31 The active cell (D3) is identified in the Name Box.















The three general methods for moving around a document are as follows:
• Movement by using the keyboard.
• Movement by using the mouse.
• Movement by using the Go To dialog box.

1.7.1 Movement by Using the Keyboard
The keyboard may be used to select a worksheet from a workbook. The keyboard may also be used to navigate around a single worksheet quickly and effectively. You may already use the arrow keys to move up, down, left, and right. Combining the Ctrl key with the arrow keys gives you the means for rapid movement. Table 1.1 lists
the most frequently used key combinations for movement.

Table 1.1 Movement Using the Keyboard
Key Combination Action
; Move one cell to the left
: Move one cell to the right
c Move up one cell
T Move down one cell
Ctrl +: Move to the far right of the worksheet
Ctrl + T Move to the bottom of the worksheet
Page Down Move down one screen
Page Up Move up one screen
Ctrl + Page Down Select next worksheet
Ctrl + Page Up Select previous worksheet
Home Move to the far-left column of worksheet
Ctrl + Home Move to a top-left cell of a worksheet (A1)
End,: Move to the right end of contiguously filled cell range
End, c Move to top of contiguously filled cell range
End,; Move to the left end of contiguously filled cell range
End, T Move to the bottom of the contiguously filled cell range

P r a c t i c e!

1. Open a new workbook.
2. Create several worksheets in the workbook using the Insert Worksheet button on the Sheet tab bar. (Excel 2003: Insert → Worksheet.)
3. Create a block of cells containing values, as shown in Figure 1.32.
4. Practice the keyboard movement commands in Table 1.1.
5. Move to the far right and bottom row of a worksheet. What is the maximum size of a worksheet?

Figure 1.32 A 5 x 4 block of contiguously filled cells for experimenting with the End key movements.
Answer: A worksheet is 1,048,576 rows by XFD (16,384) columns in Excel 2007 and 65,536 rows * 256 columns in Excel 2003.

1.7.2 Movement by Using the Mouse
The mouse is the most common way to move within a worksheet, at least, fairly small worksheets. To select a worksheet, choose a tab from the Sheet tab bar as depicted in Figure 1.33.

Figure 1.33 Click on a Sheet tab to display that worksheet.
One method of moving around a worksheet with the mouse is to click on a cell. This is most useful if the new insertion point is located on the same screen. If the desired location is on a different page, then the Vertical and Horizontal scrollbars may be used to move quickly to a distant location.

1.7.3 Movement by Using the Go To Dialog Box
If you have a large worksheet that covers many screens, then using the keyboard and mouse can be a cumbersome way of moving through the worksheet. The Go-To dialog box offers a method for moving directly to distant locations on the worksheets. To move to a location using the Go-To feature, do the following:
1. Open the Go To dialog box with Ribbon options: Home tab Editing group Find & Select drop-down menu Go To ... button. (Excel 2003: Edit → Go To.) The Go-To dialog box will open, as depicted in Figure 1.34. Or, you can press the F5 key to open the Go To dialog box.

Figure 1.34 The Go To dialog box.
 2. Type in a cell reference. For example, type G36, then click OK. The screen will display cell G36, and it will become the active cell. A history of previous references is kept in the Go To the window, so recently visited cells can be located quickly simply by selecting them with the mouse. In addition to moving to cells by location, you can move to cells of a particular type. We have not yet shown you how to create cells of different types. However, imagine that you have created a number of cells containing formulas. You can locate formulas with errors in them by using the Go To Special dialog box as follows:
1. Open the Go To Special dialog box with Ribbon options: Home tab Editing group Finds & Select drop-down menu Go To Special ... button. The Go To Special dialog box will open, as depicted in Figure 1.35. Or, you can click the Special ... button on the Go To dialog box. 
2. Select the type of cell you want to locate (e.g., Formulas with Errors), then click OK.
 
Figure 1.35 The Go To Special dialog box.
The first formula with an error will become the active cell, and all other formulas with errors will be highlighted.

1.8 SELECTING A REGION
Much of the time spent in worksheet preparation involves moving, copying, and deleting regions of cells or other objects. In this section, we will be selecting regions of cells, but the same principles apply to regions that contain charts, formulas, and other objects. Before an action can be applied to a region, the region must be selected. The selection process can be performed by using either the mouse or the keyboard.
  
1.8.1 Selection by Using Cell References
In many cases, you will have the option of typing a cell reference. For example, you can type cell references into a formula. A single cell is denoted by its column letter and row number. A rectangular range of cells is denoted by the reference for the top left and bottom-right cells. For example, the rectangle bordered by B2 on the top left and E5 on the bottom right is denoted as B2: E5 (see Figure 1.36). Note that the first selected cell (cell B2 in Figure 1.36) is shown in a different color, and indicates the active cell.

Figure 1.36 The selected cell range B2:E5.
1.8.2 Selection by Using the Mouse
To select a region of cells, called a cell range, with the mouse, click the mouse on the first cell in the range, then drag the mouse cursor to the cell at the other end of the range. As you drag the mouse, the selected region will be highlighted. To select a cell range that is larger than one screen, drag the mouse to the bottom of the screen. If you hold the mouse at the bottom of the screen without releasing the mouse button, the screen will scroll and the selected region will continue to grow. This takes a little practice. To select a whole column, click on the column header. To select a whole row, click on the row header. This is illustrated in Figure 1.37.

Figure 1.37 Selecting an entire row.
To select the entire worksheet, choose the header at the top-left corner of the worksheet, between A and 1, as illustrated in Figure 1.38. This unlabeled header is called the Select All button. This is useful if you are applying a change to every cell in a worksheet.

1.8.3 Selection by Using the Keyboard
An alternative method for selecting regions of a document is to use the keyboard, as follows:
1. Click the mouse on one corner of the region that you wish to select.
2. Hold down the Shift key and use the arrow keys to move to the other end of the region.
3. Release the Shift key.
The selected region will be highlighted. If you make a mistake and incorrectly select a region, then click the mouse cursor anywhere on the worksheet window before you apply an action (such as delete). If the highlighting disappears, then you have deselected the region.

P r a c t i c e!
Try the following exercise to practice selecting regions:
1. Click on cell B2 and type the number 5.
2. Press the down-arrow key.
3. Type the number 6.
4. Press the down-arrow key.
5. Type the number 7.
6. With the mouse, select cell range B2: B4, as shown in Figure 1.39.

Figure 1.39 Click the SUM button after selecting the cells to be added.
7. Choose the SUM button on the Ribbon’s Home tab: Home tab Editing group SUM button. (Excel 2003: AutoSum button on the Standard Toolbar.)
A formula for cell B5 will be added that contains the sum of cells B2, B3, and B4. The results should resemble Figure 1.40.

Figure 1.40 The SUM function is entered just below the selected cell range.
1.9 CUTTING, MOVING, COPYING, AND PASTING
Once a region has been selected, you may take several actions, such as delete, move, copy, and paste. As usual, Excel provides several ways to accomplish the same actions. These include using keyboard commands and mouse commands. The cut, copy, and paste commands make use of a special location called the Windows clipboard. The clipboard is a temporary storage location that can be used to hold the contents of a cell, a range of cells, or most other objects such as charts. To view the contents of the clipboard, click the Clipboard button at the bottom-right
corner of the Clipboard group in the Ribbon’s Home tab as shown in Figure 1.41. (You do not need to see the clipboard contents to use the clipboard.)

Figure 1.41 The Clipboard group on the Ribbon’s Home tab.
1.9.1 Cutting a Region
Cutting a region (e.g., a range of cells) removes the contents of the selected region from the worksheet and leaves them on the clipboard. A region may be cut by using the mouse or the keyboard.
To cut a region using the mouse, follow these steps:
1. Select a region.
2. Click the Cut button in the Clipboard group in the Ribbon’s Home tab. (Excel 2003: Choose Edit → Cut.) The region to be cut will be highlighted by a rotating dashed line.
Alternative methods for cutting a selected region include the following:
• Select the region to be cut, then right-click on the selected region. Select Cut from the pop-up menu.
• Select the region to be cut, then press Ctrl + X.
No matter which method you use to cut the region, the effect is to place the contents of the region on the clipboard. This will be displayed in the Clipboard Task pane if the pane is visible. Figure 1.42 illustrates a region of four cells in Column B that have been selected and cut.

Figure 1.42 Four cells on the clipboard.
Notice that the cut cells have not been removed from the worksheet. The process of cutting the cells marks the cells for removal, but they are not actually removed unless the cut procedure is followed by a paste procedure. This is described in the next section.

1.9.2 Moving a Region (Cut and Paste)
A region may be moved by first cutting the region (to the clipboard) and then pasting it (from the clipboard) to the new location. The cut and paste operation may be performed by using the mouse or the keyboard.

To move a region using the mouse, do the following:
1. Select and cut a region. This places the contents of the region on the clipboard.
2. Select a destination cell or region.
3. Click the Paste button in the Clipboard group in the Ribbon’s Home tab. (Excel 2003: Choose Edit → Paste from the Menu bar.) 

The region of cells should now appear in the new location. If you do not select a destination region of the same size and shape as the cut region, then Excel will create a region with the appropriate size. Alternative methods for pasting clipboard contents include the following:
• Right-click on the selected destination region, and then select Paste from the pop-up menu.
• Select the destination, then press Ctrl + V.

1.9.3 Copying a Region
Copying a region is very similar to moving a region, except that the contents of the original region remain intact; they are copied to the clipboard, not cut (moved) to the clipboard.

To copy a region using the mouse, follow these steps:
1. Select a region.
2. Click the Copy button in the Clipboard group in the Ribbon’s Home tab. (Excel 2003: Choose Edit → Copy.) 
The region to be cut will be highlighted by a rotating dashed line.
Alternative methods for cutting a selected region include the following:
• Select the region to be cut, then right-click on the selected region. Select Copy from the pop-up menu.
• Select the region to be cut, then press Ctrl + C.
Note: The keyboard shortcuts for cutting (Ctrl + X), copying (Ctrl + C), and pasting (Ctrl + V) use adjacent keys, shown in Figure 1.43, to make them easier to remember.

1.10 INSERTING AND DELETING CELLS
New cells may be added to a worksheet, and existing cells may be deleted (removed) or cleared (emptied).
1.10.1 Deleting Cells
Deleting a region of cells removes the cells from the worksheet. The vacancies, or holes, that are left behind must be filled in, and Excel will open the Delete dialog box (shown in Figure 1.44) to ask you how you want to fill the vacancies.

Figure 1.44 The Delete dialog box.
To delete a region of cells, follow these steps:
1. Select the region of cells to be deleted.
2. Right-click the selected region and choose Delete ... from the pop-up menu. The Delete dialog box will appear, as shown in Figure 1.44.
3. Choose whether you want Excel to fill the vacancies created by deleting the cells by
• shifting the remaining cells up or to the left,
• shifting the entire row below the vacancies up, or
• shifting the entire column to the right of the vacancies to the left.
4. Click OK to close the Delete dialog box and delete the selected cells.

1.10.2 Clearing Cells
To remove the contents of cells without deleting the cells themselves, perform these steps:
1. Select the region of cells to be deleted.
2. Right-click the selected region and choose Clear Contents from the pop-up menu. (Or, press the Delete key.)
1.10.3 Inserting Cells
You can insert new cells, rows, columns, or an entire worksheet using the Insert drop-down menu on the Ribbon’s Home tab (see Figure 1.45): Home tab → Cells group →Insert drop-down menu. (Excel 2003: Use the Insert menu option.)

Figure 1.45 The Insert drop-down menu.
1.11 SHORTCUT KEYS
As a novice user, you may have trouble finding commands. The Ribbon in Excel 2007 has been designed to display commonly used commands where you can find them, but it still takes some getting used to. Shortcut keys are the quickest way to

Table 1.2 Commonly Used Shortcut Keys
Command Shortcut
New Workbook Ctrl + N
Open Workbook Ctrl + O
Save Workbook Ctrl + S
Print Ctrl + P
Undo Ctrl + Z
Cut Ctrl + X
Copy Ctrl + C
Paste Ctrl + V
Find Ctrl + F
Replace Ctrl + H
Go To Ctrl + G
Format Cells Ctrl + 1
Help F1
Spell Check F7

execute a command and can save time, but they have to be memorized. The good news is that most are commonly used by lots of programs, not just Excel. Table 1.2 lists common shortcut key combinations.
One method of learning some of the shortcuts is to look at the Screen Tips for Ribbon items. Screen Tips are descriptions that are displayed when you let the mouse hover over a Ribbon item. For example, in Figure 1.46, the Screen Tip for the Copy button is shown, and it indicates that the keyboard shortcut for the copy operation is Ctrl + C.

Figure 1.46 The Screen Tips for Ribbon items often indicate the keyboard shortcut.

1.12 FINDING AND CORRECTING MISTAKES
Let’s face it, mistakes happen. Finding mistakes in a complex Excel worksheet can be a challenge. A couple of simple fixes are described here:
• Undo (Ctrl + Z)
• Spell Check (F7)
• AutoCorrect

1.12.1 Undoing Mistakes
Excel allows actions to be undone or reversed. To undo the last action, click the Undo button on the Quick Access toolbar (indicated in Figure 1.47) or type Ctrl + Z. (Excel 2003: Choose Edit → Undo from the Menu bar.)

Figure 1.47 The Undo button on the Quick Access Toolbar.
To see the list of recent actions, choose the down-arrow button next to the Undo button. From this list, you may select one or more actions to be undone. Note that if you select an action on the list, then all of the actions above it in the list will also be undone! If you accidentally undo an action, then you may redo it by selecting the Redo button, which is next to the Undo button.

1.12.2 Checking Spelling
Excel can check the spelling of cells containing text. To check the spelling in a region, first, select the region, then click the Spelling button on the Ribbon’s Review tab: Review tab → Proofing group → Spelling button. Or, press the F7

Figure 1.48 The Spelling dialog box.
key. If Excel finds a spelling mistake, then the Spelling dialog box will appear, as shown in Figure 1.48.
The text thought to be in error is displayed in the top text box. Suggestions for changes are presented in the bottom text box. At any point in the process, you can choose whether to accept or ignore the suggestions. If you choose a suggested correction, then you may click the Change All button to change all occurrences of the misspelled word in the selected region.
You may add new words to the dictionary by choosing the Add to Dictionary button. This will probably be necessary as you proceed through your coursework since many engineering terms are not in the default dictionary.

1.12.3 The AutoCorrect Feature
The Excel AutoCorrect feature recognizes some spelling errors and corrects them automatically.AutoCorrect performs actions such as automatically capitalizing the first letter of a sentence or correcting a word whose first two letters are capitalized.
You can test to see if the AutoCorrect feature is turned on for your installation of Excel. Try typing the letters you, then press the spacebar. Was the word automatically retyped as you? If so, then you have AutoCorrect turned on.
To see your AutoCorrect settings and dictionary, use Office → Excel Options → Proofing tab → AutoCorrect Options (Excel 2003: Tools →AutoCorrect Options). The AutoCorrect dialog box will appear, as shown in Figure 1.49.
From the AutoCorrect dialog box, you can select (or deselect) various options. You can also scroll through the AutoCorrect dictionary, add entries to the dictionary, and add exceptions to the dictionary. Creating an exception list will be necessary if you use all of the AutoCorrect features. For example, if you have selected the option that automatically converts the second capital letter to lowercase, you may have an occasional exception. Be careful when adding new entries into the Auto- Correct dictionary. You may inadvertently add an entry for a misspelling that is a legitimate word.

Figure 1.49 The AutoCorrect dialog box.
1.13 PRINTING
Before attempting to print a document, make sure that your printer is correctly configured. See your operating system and printer documentation for assistance.

1.13.1 Setting the Print Area
An Excel 2007 worksheet contains 1,048,576 rows by 16,384 columns.That would be a huge area to print. Excel never prints all cells in a worksheet; it prints a rectangular region that contains all of the cells that have contents. If you want to print a smaller region of a worksheet, you must first set the print area. To set the print area, perform the following steps:
1. Select the region that is to be printed.
2. Set the print area using Ribbon options: Page Layout tab→Page Setup group→ Print Area drop-down menu→Set Print Area option. (Excel 2003: File → Print Area → Set Print Area.)

1.13.2 Previewing a Worksheet
It is advisable to use the Print Preview feature to preview a document before printing it. Many formatting problems can be resolved during the preview process. To preview the document as it will be printed, do the following:
1. Set the print area (if you want to print only a portion of your work.)
2. Activate print preview: Office button → Print submenu → Print Preview. (Excel 2003: File →Print Preview.)

Figure 1.50 The Print Preview screen and Ribbon tab.
The Print Preview screen will be displayed, along with the Print Preview Ribbon tab, as shown in Figure 1.50.
There are four very useful commands available on the Print Preview Ribbon tab:
Print button—sends what you are previewing to the printer.
Page Setup button—opens the Page Setup dialog box which allows you to adjust the way your document prints.
Show Margins button—displays margin lines on the preview screen. You can move the margin lines with the mouse to adjust the margins.
Close Print Preview button—gets you back to the Excel worksheet. To really control the way your worksheet prints, you will want to use the Page Setup dialog box, shown in Figure 1.51. Two of the most useful controls are on the Page panel, shown in this figure.
• Select Orientation: Portrait or Landscape.
Fit to 1 page wide by 1 tall.
The Fit to option takes everything that is going to be printed and scales it to fit on the number of pages you indicate. The most common use is to force a worksheet to print on one page.
The Margins panel on the Page Setup dialog box provides another way to adjust margins. The Header/Footer panel allows you to print a header or footer on

Figure 1.51 The Page Setup dialog box, Page panel.
page of the printout. Options include page numbers, author name, file name, or custom text.
The Sheet panel can be used to include
Gridlines (to show the cells)
Row and column headings
on the printout.

1.13.3 Printing a Worksheet
You can print a worksheet in several ways. To print a worksheet, choose one of the following methods:
• Use the Office button →Print sub-menu →Print. (Excel 2003: File →Print.)
• Click the Print button on the Ribbon’s Print Preview tab.
• Press Ctrl + P.
Whichever method you use, the Print dialog box will open as shown in Figure 1.52.
The Print dialog box allows you to select a printer, activate or deactivate collating,
indicate the number of copies to print, and select a range of pages. The Properties
button provides access to a set of options that depends on the type of printer you
have connected to your computer or network.
Once you have set the desired printing characteristics, click the OK button to send your worksheet to your printer.

Figure 1.52 The Print dialog box.
active cell
AutoCorrect
AutoRecover
backup
cell
cell range
cell reference (e.g., B2)
clipboard (Windows
clipboard)
close button
column heading
control buttons
copy
cut
dialog box
Excel
file extensions (.xls,
.xlsx, .xlsm)
formula (equation)
Formula bar
gridlines
group (Ribbon group)
Help System
Home tab
Insert Function button
macro
macro virus
Maximize/Restore button
Minimize button
Name box
Office button
paste
print
print area
print preview
Quick Access Toolbar
range (cell range)
Redo button
Ribbon
Ribbon tabs
row heading
Screen Tip
search
Sheet tab
shortcut keys
spell check
spreadsheet
Status bar
template
Title bar
Undo button
work area
workbook
workbook window
worksheet

SUMMARY                                                                                                                        
Excel Screen Layout
• Title Bar
• Ribbon
• Quick Access Toolbar
• Office Button

• Formula Bar
• Work Area
• Sheet Tabs
• Status Bar
Office Button
• Open workbooks
• Save workbooks
• Print workbooks
• Set Excel Options
Control Buttons
• Minimize Button
• Maximize/Restore Window Toggle
• Close button
Ribbon
Tab→Group→Drop-down Menu→Button
Home tab—commonly used commands for formatting and sorting.
Insert tab—used to insert objects such as charts and hyperlinks.
Page Layout tab—used to modify entire sheets (apply themes, set print area, etc.).
Formulas tab—used to insert functions and manage defined names of cells and cell ranges.
Data tab—provides access to sorting and filtering features, and data analysis tools (if activated).
Review tab—used to add comments and track changes to a worksheet.
View tab—used to change the display magnification (zoom), and to show or hide features such as the Formula bar and gridlines.

Help System (F1)
• Browsing the Help Topic List
• Searching the Help system

Working with Excel Workbooks
• Create a New Workbook: Office→New→Blank Workbook→Create
• Open an Existing Workbook: Office → Open → (browse to find the file) → Open
• Saving a Workbook:
❍ First time: Office →Save As →(browse for folder, assign file name) →Save
❍ If already named: Office → Save (Or, click Save button on Quick Access Toolbar.)
Adding a Worksheet to a Workbook
❍ Click the Insert Worksheet button that is the rightmost Sheet tab.
Excel File Extensions
❍ .xls—version 2003 or earlier
❍ .xlsx—the default filename extension in Excel 2007, macros disabled
❍ .xlsm—Excel 2007 macro-enabled workbook

Moving around Worksheet Using the Keyboard
Key Combination Action
← Move one cell to the left
→ Move one cell to the right
↑ Move up one cell
↓ Move down one cell
Ctrl +→ Move to the far right of the worksheet
Ctrl +↓ Move to the bottom of the worksheet
Page Down Move down one screen
Page Up Move up one screen
Ctrl + Page Down Select next worksheet
Ctrl + Page Up Select previous worksheet
Home Move to a far-left column of worksheet
Ctrl + Home Move to a top-left cell of a worksheet (A1)
End,→ Move to the right end of contiguously filled cell range
End,↑ Move to top of contiguously filled cell range
End,← Move to the left end of contiguously filled cell range
End,↓ Move to the bottom of the contiguously filled cell range

Cut or Copy
1. Select a region.
2. Click the Cut or Copy button in the Clipboard group in the Ribbon’s Home tab.
Paste
1. When there is material on the Clipboard, select a destination cell or region.
2. Click the Paste button in the Clipboard group in the Ribbon’s Home tab.

Shortcut Keys
Command Shortcut
New Workbook Ctrl + N
Open Workbook Ctrl + O
Save Workbook Ctrl + S
Print Ctrl + P
Undo Ctrl + Z
Cut Ctrl + X
Copy Ctrl + C
Paste Ctrl + V
Find Ctrl + F
Replace Ctrl + H
Go To Ctrl + G
Format Cells Ctrl + 1
Help F1
Spell Check F7

Printing
Set Print Area
1. Select the region that is to be printed.
2. Set the print area using Ribbon options: Page Layout tab→Page Setup group→
Print Area drop-down menu→Set Print Area option.

Print Preview
• Office button→Print submenu→Print Preview.
Print Alternatives
• Use the Office button→Print submenu→Print. (Excel 2003: File → Print.)
• Click the Print button on the Ribbon’s Print Preview tab.
• Press Ctrl + P.

                                                                                                                       PROBLEMS

1.1 Test your understanding by filling in the blanks.
• The _____ _____ displays the name of the currently open workbook.
• The Home, Insert, and Page Layout tabs are found on the _____.
• Clicking on the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar has the same effect as choosing _____ from the Office menu.

1.2 What is the maximum number of rows and columns for a single Excel worksheet?

1.3 Use the Insert Function dialog box to identify the Excel function names for the following mathematical functions:
_____ sine
_____ arithmetic mean
_____ natural logarithm
_____ convert degrees to radians
_____ remove or truncate the decimal part of a number
_____ return e raised to the power of a number

1.4 Name two ways to undo a mistake.

1.5 Identify the shortcut keys for the following actions:
_____ Help
_____ Copy selected region
_____ Cut select region
_____ Move to the beginning of a worksheet

1.6 Visit the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Physics Laboratory’s website about the International System of Units (SI) at http://physics. nist.gov/cuu/units.
Click on the menu item labeled SI units, and locate the table for SI Base Units. Use that table to fill in the missing entries in Table 1.3.

Table 1.3 SI Base Units
Quantity Name Symbol
length m
kilogram kg
time second
electric current ampere
temperature K
mole mol
luminous intensity cd

1.7 The electronic spreadsheet has played an important role in the history of computing. The links presented here discuss the history of electronic spreadsheets. Access these websites with your web browser and then answer the questions
that follow:
Power, D.J., A Brief History of Spreadsheets, at http://www.dssresources. com/history/sshistory.html.
Mattessich, Richard. Spreadsheet: Its First Computerization (1961–1964) at http://www.j-walk.com/ss/history/spreadsh.htm.
• What is the name of the first marketed electronic spreadsheet that was
partly responsible for the early success of the Apple computer?
• In what year was Excel originally introduced (for Macintosh computers)?

1.8 Excel’s trigonometric function PI returns an approximation of the mathematical constant Read the information about PI on the Insert Function dialog box to determine the number of digits of the accuracy of the constant returned by this function.

1.9 Describe the difference between three of Excel’s logarithm functions: LN, LOG, and LOG10. Use the Help system to find the answer to this question.

1.10 Explain the difference between Cut-and-Paste and Copy-and-Paste. Which would you use if you needed to
• move a column of values to a new location within a worksheet?
• create a table in a Word document from a table of values in an Excel worksheet (leaving the Excel worksheet unchanged)?

1.11 Access Microsoft’s website (www.microsoft.com) to find a calendar template for Excel. (Enter Excel calendar template in the search box on the Microsoft web page.) How many Excel calendar templates are available for downloading?

1.12 Perform a Google® search on the phrase Excel Tips. On a scale from 0 (no information) to 10 (massive amounts of information), how much information is available about Excel online?

Chapter Complete...!

I hope you liked it...! Thanks a Lot Please do sharing.!


No comments:

Post a Comment